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By Rafal SLEK
#321303
scraptrash wrote: Tue Jan 19, 2021 7:58 am
Mjules wrote: Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:30 pm Here's an interesting comparison between ArchiCAD and Revit: https://www.buildercentral.com/revit-vs-archicad/
I think it’s not just interesting. It’s hilarious. :lol:
That’s why I don't believe that such comparison could be reliable.
Cinerender as plugin, User Interface winner Revit... :mrgreen:
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By Jose Gemez
#321473
My first "bim" software was Allplan (2003)... Then Archicad for many years... then Revit for 4 years aprox... and now I'm back with Archicad... In my opinion is the best tools for Architects... maybe not the best bim tools but if you are a architect without doubt is the best tool... archicad and a good pencil ;)
By jl_lt
#321477
hi! would you mind comenting on the different experiences you had using the 3 softwares? What kind of projects did you worked on, what you could do better in each software? What made you come back to ArchiCAD?
By Aleks Dzi
#321478
Jose Gemez wrote: Sat Jan 23, 2021 1:21 pm My first "bim" software was Allplan (2003)... Then Archicad for many years... then Revit for 4 years aprox... and now I'm back with Archicad... In my opinion is the best tools for Architects... maybe not the best bim tools but if you are a architect without doubt is the best tool... archicad and a good pencil ;)
Yes would like to know aswell)
#323999
I would say that Revit is like driving an old car, and Archicad is the Ferrari. I have experience with both software, I've developed complete projects with Revit and Archicad, and I would never go back to Revit, never ever... I would say Archicad is the smart guy of BIM technology.
By jl_lt
#324420
So, the other day i got to see a Revit model of a medium sized project in action and even handled it a bit. The project was about 20,000m2 multifamily project, but not that complex and the clients pc is somewhere between medium high and high spectrum, not a workstation nor anything like that but they got 32gb ram (more than my laptop :? ), and the project was done by a reputed local office.

Lets just say that if i ever needed reassurance that i made the right choice with Archicad this was it. The model handled like the clunky mess i remember from when i took my basic revit courses, but worse because the model was bigger. The level of detail was dismal for a supposedly finished project that cost dozens of thousands of dollars; i could almost imagine the modellers giving up on the model (and life), their faces resting in defeat at their keyboards. Forget about editability.

I was very shocked by this experience. Knowing the office that made the project i expected something much better (i learned later that they do heavy editing in Autocad). I mean, why do they still use this?? Maybe it is an isolated experience and the rest of Revit offices have a very enjoyable process and the output is great, but i seriously doubt it.
#324423
We have both though majority AC. IMO AC is an autobahn sportswagon on a wheat field while Revit is a tractor on autobahn...kind of :).
#324439
jl_lt wrote: Fri Apr 09, 2021 5:47 am So, the other day i got to see a Revit model of a medium sized project in action and even handled it a bit. The project was about 20,000m2 multifamily project, but not that complex and the clients pc is somewhere between medium high and high spectrum, not a workstation nor anything like that but they got 32gb ram (more than my laptop :? ), and the project was done by a reputed local office.

Lets just say that if i ever needed reassurance that i made the right choice with Archicad this was it. The model handled like the clunky mess i remember from when i took my basic revit courses, but worse because the model was bigger. The level of detail was dismal for a supposedly finished project that cost dozens of thousands of dollars; i could almost imagine the modellers giving up on the model (and life), their faces resting in defeat at their keyboards. Forget about editability.

I was very shocked by this experience. Knowing the office that made the project i expected something much better (i learned later that they do heavy editing in Autocad). I mean, why do they still use this?? Maybe it is an isolated experience and the rest of Revit offices have a very enjoyable process and the output is great, but i seriously doubt it.


Offices that you see that have Revit and do large projects and (seem to) have no complaints about it or specifically the performance, is usually almost certainly because they have powerful workstations.

I mean,...as a general rule, in architecture you should have high end hardware regardless of whatever software you're running - or at least as high end as your budget and resources can allow.
But in the cases of Revit users, that I've personally observed and experienced, this is simply not a choice if you want to work comfortably.

That software is simply not optimized to run well on anything outside of really high end computers.
And even then it's anything but an enjoyable experience.
A lot of the cause of the issues is the parametric engine they use and the constraints orgy that define a Revit workflow - so much so that their BIM managers will remind people often to disable automatic constraints as much as they can to avoid fatal crashes and slowdown later on.

You've heard of stories of offices where they have licenses of Sketchup and Rhino which are what they use to do the actual design work, and then the documentation is handled by BIM-monkeys on Revit.
It's because you simply can not design or do design on Revit.
All your design issues have to have been worked out fully by the time you get to working on Revit, because of said performance nightmares.
By jl_lt
#324443
I´ve heard that (that you dont do design work in revit and that they model twice). I took Revit courses which covered the basics, but never got to do any real design work on it nor got to see it directly being used by experienced users, so even if i never liked revit and my bad opinions on it amounts to my personal experience with using it in those courses (which i loathed), some minimal work here and there and finished deliverables on projects of various sizes, i always conceded that we, non Revit users, might fall into exagerations and that Revit users might know something that we dont. Not anymore.
Last edited by jl_lt on Sun May 09, 2021 7:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
By Dendarii
#324718
After working on both Revit and Archicad extensively (high end residential projects) below are my thoughts on the two programs:

Summary - I would never work on Revit by choice; Archicad is much nicer and more productive to work on as a design Architect; it’s such a shame Revit is used so prevalently purely because of the selling power of Autodesk.

Revit positives are that it is easier for beginners/less experienced users as there are far less settings (no layers etc.) so users can begin modelling with little thought to tool settings. 3D live details are standard from all detail callouts. Tagging drawings is easier as tags just work on all elements/surfaces in the views.

Other than that Revit is slow and clunky, very poor 2D drafting, modelling the 3D building is tedious (join lines in 2D to create 3D elements – and hope for no errors). Trying to do design work in Revit is frustrating due to the inability to navigate/visualize in 3D or make adjustments in 3D.

Archicad is much faster/fluid (especially on high end computers) and replaces all design office programs in one integrated interface (ie. autocad, revit, rhino, InDesign, illustrator etc. functionality all in one). The design/coordination process is helped by Archicad (rather than a hindrance in Revit) due to fast 3D modelling and visualization capabilities.

While both programs have some issues for me Archicad’s breadth of abilities is far greater than Revit which is just a construction documentation tool.
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