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Moderators: Karl Ottenstein, LaszloNagy, ejrolon, Barry Kelly, Gordana Radonic, nbalogh, mnguyen, gkmethy, mtron, Csaba Kézér

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By LaszloNagy
#321222
If you are sure it is either Archicad or Revit, then I would say Revit.
Revit can create those sketchy lines in the 3D Window, and you can also adjust the opacity of the individual elements in it (like those Walls). Also, parallel projection is very common in Revit because a lot less can be done in perspective in Revit, while people using Archicad usually work in perspective projection in 3D.
I can think of a way the same opacity effect could be achieved in Archicad in 3D, but not the sketchy lines, this is why my guess is Revit in this case.
User avatar
By Moonlight
#321232
@Mjules

when you find any type of BIM platforms comparisons, you have to slice it with a scaple, for instance ...
  • Price & Licencing: How you not heard/read the "Letter to Autodesk", about rising Revit fees year after year.

    See:
    (176.68 KiB) Downloaded 11 times

    See:
    (2.73 MiB) Downloaded 4 times

    See:
    See:
  • User Interface: I have never heard, watch or seen any Revit User that knew how to use another BIM software and ever liked it (personal taste exists), infact many first timers ArchiCAD users who only use Revit before have made remarks on how hard it was to use the Revit Interfase.
  • Massing: Compare it to ArchiCAD's Morph, infact few years ago ArchiCAD channel release a video series on how to model master architectural works, you should check it out.

    The only thing that Revit can throw back on ArchiCAD on massing, is that you can convert Masses to Revit's standard element.
  • Nesting: I didn't comprehend about writer's referencing Nesting, anyway, if he meant model nesting, I do that all the time, and if meant family nesting .... well, using GDL programming, except for few cases, you can bypass the whole nesting idea ....
  • Workflow Between Programs: return to "Letter to Autodesk".
  • Plugins: Appearantly this guy doesn't know Revit ecosystem, if we're talking about number of plugins available on each platform them Revit is a winner, but if we are talking about plugins that must be created to fix issues and bypass Revit constringante user experiance with Revit, well it's hugh.
  • Simulations: In my opinion, having simulations in Revit is a plus, but in reality, many countries have their own programs that are adjusted to their local and regional norms and regulations for structural design, MEP, construction process and etc, leaving Revit's simulations as useless or not to be trusted.

    Example, The use of CYPE programs for structural design in Spain is quiet extendened, due to how it was designed to not only give you the safest options, but also, the most accurate updated regulations.

    PS: I have added some PDFs about "Letter to Autodesk", but I'm sure you can find more about those issues.
#321236
Mjules wrote: Sun Jan 17, 2021 10:30 pm Here's an interesting comparison between ArchiCAD and Revit: https://www.buildercentral.com/revit-vs-archicad/



I wouldn't buy lemonade from that guy let alone software (which is what he happens to sell seeing as he's an Autodesk reseller).

He doesn't seem to know what the hell he's talking about - particularly when it comes to ArchiCAD's capabilities.

Furthermore, his argument in favour of Revit seems to be that although ArchiCAD is "simpler" and more "straight-foward" (read : easier) to use, Revit's complexity is a boon in its favor because it allows one to do more complex things.

I've never heard a Revit user claim that its complicated spreadsheet-like interface and workflow is a benefit in its favour in working with it as a program.

He then gives a rather comical anecdote of once having observed a comparison competition between a Revit user and an ArchiCAD user in modeling a house, in which he claims the Revit user completed it in half the time the ArchiCAD user did.
He then admits that while he didn't know what the respective user skill levels were of both users in their respective programs were (something that you'd think is actually crucial information to know and having in assessing the two), he still has to conclude as a result of that that Revit was the superior program.

Mind-boggling.

With such 'superior' logic like that, we should all be beating a path to his store and reserve our Revit licenses.
By Aleks Dzi
#321237
LaszloNagy wrote: Mon Jan 18, 2021 11:12 am If you are sure it is either Archicad or Revit, then I would say Revit.
Revit can create those sketchy lines in the 3D Window, and you can also adjust the opacity of the individual elements in it (like those Walls). Also, parallel projection is very common in Revit because a lot less can be done in perspective in Revit, while people using Archicad usually work in perspective projection in 3D.
I can think of a way the same opacity effect could be achieved in Archicad in 3D, but not the sketchy lines, this is why my guess is Revit in this case.
Ive just got full project, maybe it make all clear)
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ium3oh ... sp=sharing
User avatar
By LaszloNagy
#321241
Sorry, now I cannot decide whether it is Archicad or Revit. It may be Archicad because many of the furniture elements look like they are from the Archicad default library, like Bed, L-shaped Sofa, Plasma TV, etc.
Is it not possible for you to ask the person from whom you obtained this PDF which program was used?
By Aleks Dzi
#321245
LaszloNagy wrote: Mon Jan 18, 2021 3:45 pm Sorry, now I cannot decide whether it is Archicad or Revit. It may be Archicad because many of the furniture elements look like they are from the Archicad default library, like Bed, L-shaped Sofa, Plasma TV, etc.
Is it not possible for you to ask the person from whom you obtained this PDF which program was used?
Unfortunately not possible, but my guesses at moment Archicad but still want to be sure)
By jl_lt
#321256
Normally, projects i have seen of this size and scope done in Revit are a mess, but that isnt to say it cannot be done, so It could be either one of them. My first bet was also Archicad, but looking a little bit closer i would go with Revit.

Some furniture, windows, notation style and some hatches make me think more of Revit than Archicad.
By jl_lt
#321260
Also, about the software comparison. It definitely looks very sketchy since the author is an Autodesk vendor.

instead of very general things which most comparisons talk about, it would be interesting for which kind and size of projects each software is good for. Im thinking even something purely hipotetical, like which software the old masters would likely use if they practiced today. For example, i think the likes of Le corbusier, Kahn, Barragan would fly on Archicad, while FrankLloyd wright would have to reluctantly go with Revit, mostly because of families for his custom made objects and details. i Imagine Mies taking advantage of archicads curtain wall. Aalto could use any of them (there is even a thesis floating around the internet where 2 guys set out to model Aalto´s state office building with both Revit and Archicad and get to interesting conclusions. Short story, Archicad wins, but Revit was no slouch).

On the other hand, projects like the US air force academy by SOM. I have seen 2 videos about it. The one with Revit achieves an spectacular result. The one with Archicad... not so much.

and on and on
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