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Modelling and drafting in ARCHICAD. (Example: How can I model a Roof soffit/fascia?)

Moderators: Karl Ottenstein, LaszloNagy, ejrolon, Barry Kelly, gkmethy

By RookB
#310342
Hey folks --

I might be missing something obvious, but it seems like in the 3D model, identical surfaces will always blend together without a separating line (assuming they're adjacent and in plane with each other), regardless of layer, element type, etc. Is there any quick way to prevent this?

Context: I'd love to see my studs and other framing members read in 3D as distinct pieces, and not merge together when they double or triple-up, or when they meet at joints.

Attached: on the left are three studs adjacent to each other, but they read as a single piece. I'd like to avoid this. The best solution I can think of is on the right, where I've duplicated the Surface used and assigned it to the middle stud only. The result is clean, but it'd be a nightmare to apply this to the whole model.

Any ideas for better solutions?

Thanks much!!
Attachments
Screen Shot 2020-04-30 at 9.58.13 AM.png
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By LaszloNagy
#310360
Or move the middle stud 0.1 mm back so it is not exactly flush with the other two studs.
The move should be so small that no dimension displays it, but ARCHICAD will know they are not flush.
(Of course you might not like this solution, because in CAD we are taught to always model precisely, and I am suggesting you not to model precisely :) )
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By sboydturner
#310373
LaszloNagy wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 3:08 am
Or move the middle stud 0.1 mm back so it is not exactly flush with the other two studs.
The move should be so small that no dimension displays it, but ARCHICAD will know they are not flush.
(Of course you might not like this solution, because in CAD we are taught to always model precisely, and I am suggesting you not to model precisely :) )
Laszlo’s solution is probably closest to reality as you will always have an air film between any elements unless you are CN milling to the micron level, this also the easiest to model / implement

Regards
Scott
#310384
I think Dave's solution is the best/cleanest option so that modeling can remain precise. It's also super easy and requires no modification to the model.

Any time you choose to model slightly 'off' it has the possibility to bite you down the road when you use snap points, stretching, moving etc. (In reality, everything in a building is 'off'... but should not be in the CAD model.)

My 2 cents.
By DGSketcher
#310385
I do a lot of framing in my current work and would also back the view that assigning a different surface material is the best option and keep your drawing as accurate as possible. I quickly learned those 0.1mm offsets rapidly cause problems on a bigger job. On a small job with a one off frame either method should work ok.