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Discussions about managing Archicad in architectural practices (Project Setup, Templates, Attributes, Migration, Compatibility with Previous Versions, Preferences/Work Environment, User/Project/Application Administration/Management etc.)

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#325789
Hi,
I got hold of a cost classification system. It consists of a code (no regular standard but unique to the company selling the database), name, unit and unit cost. I've imported the database as a classification and then used expressions to sort out the data I want. I've merged different data in the name field in the underlying xml. Similar to what Eduardo Rolon showed at Architensive. I wonder if anyone have done this in large scale and can share some pros and cons. Only con for me so far, and it's a biggie, is that it's not dynamic. When costs change I need to update the schema manually and replace the classification in Archicad. Pros are obvoius but the biggest one is that I can use excel for the main table of items and add additional info...I'm thinking CO2 etc.
I should mention it's element level costs...not building elements in Archicad... I have 70 wooden walls etc...
Br,
Mats
#325798
HI Mats_Knutsson:

You did not provide enough info to determine exactly want you intend. But I am guessing that you are using Excel to bring in your cost data. Schedules have this ability but can be limited.

You might check out the use of Python to further your control. At this point python has no capability to create classifications or properties but it seems that you already have that set up

I've used a external Excel SS as the fill in for cost properties for different objects as a office standard dictates. The architect only has to bring in the library part and the python program will automatically fill in the related data as predetermined for the project. The advantage is that you can be selective as to what is filled in ,using previously decided data. and the designer does not have to fill in properties or send them out to be filled in if they have been previously agreed upon. Works very well and takes some load away from the designer.

There is a video on this at:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rALzI6cFhJo
#325799
poco2013 wrote: Wed May 12, 2021 6:32 am HI Mats_Knutsson:

You did not provide enough info to determine exactly want you intend. But I am guessing that you are using Excel to bring in your cost data. Schedules have this ability but can be limited.

You might check out the use of Python to further your control. At this point python has no capability to create classifications or properties but it seems that you already have that set up

I've used a external Excel SS as the fill in for cost properties for different objects as a office standard dictates. The architect only has to bring in the library part and the python program will automatically fill in the related data as predetermined for the project. The advantage is that you can be selective as to what is filled in ,using previously decided data. and the designer does not have to fill in properties or send them out to be filled in if they have been previously agreed upon. Works very well and takes some load away from the designer.

There is a video on this at:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rALzI6cFhJo
Hi Poco :),
I saw your vid as soon as it got out on youtube. Great stuff but too complicated for me since I'm not versed into Python. I don't have the time right now...probably never...to learn to python myself but luckily I have colleagues that know Python.
However I've been doing property transfer the regular way with export-import from excel and it's working great as long as I can reserve all elements...=usually not very easy since it's full speed teamworking.
What I'm after is a "loose" cost estimate for our architects so that they can have an idea of what this wall would cost... or how much CO2 it contains. By choosing the element type (from the custom classification) I get the properties populated with the values I've set up in the classification. Admittedly a work around but very smooth. If I update the classification system all the users have to do is import the new system and replace the old one. I'm just started to scratch the surface on this topic but it's really interesting. Also we're on 23 so Python projects are planned for 25 as we skip 24.
Br,
Mats
#325803
OK--Now I think I understand your process. I did,however,somewhat mis-speak because Python can assign classifications to elements and therefore the associated properties. It can not create new classifications.(It can create a new classification XML file) This would eliminate your necessity of having to manually attach your new classes to the target elements. It can assign property values to targeted elements, either directly or by reading a Excel file,once those elements were classified as you are doing.

However, the point is moot, since 23 can not run the current version of Python. I assume 25 would contain all the capabilities of 24 but I have no way of knowing.

Your approach is entreating and i think a Python app would greatly organize and simplify it. The point is not to be a Python programmer, others can do that for you. But to control the project through generally understood software such as Excel which allows a manager to pre-configure the projects materials, material and object specifications, builder's notes and, of course, cost calculations (somewhat eliminating expressions).

The process is now fairly simple and straight forward, but, would require you to upgrade to 25. When or if you get to that point I'm here to discuss the capabilities of any potential Python automation. I think you would be pleasantly surprised.
#325871
Hi Mats,
I don't know if this is helpful or not, however I have set up a data export (the old way using lists) as a csv file with all quantities each with the cost centre and item code as fields.
With VBA I import into a set range in excel and use vlookup to populate the cost centre tabs. I have a separate price file sheet with concatenated cost centre/itemcode description and prices which is also loaded in using vlookup.
The key points are:
1. Archicad contains the quantities and fixed data about the elements.
2. The price file contains the prices or volatile data about the elements and can be used across many different projects.
3. Different price files can be used depending on different purchasing agreements.
4. Price file can be easily updated, and could be kept in a secure location and used in a read-only method.
5. The BOQ file collates the info from AC and Price file and delivers in a meaningful way.

Just wondered if AC was the most beneficial place to keep the cost data?
Hope this is of some help.
David