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Everything about GDL - Doors/Windows/Objects/Stairs etc. (Example: I created an object that prints an error message in 3D all the time, please help!)

Moderators: Karl Ottenstein, LaszloNagy, ejrolon, Barry Kelly, gkmethy, Gergely Feher

#305625
When viewing a library object's 3d model, I'm presented with a standard basis at the origin of my object. However, when I move the view (e.g. orbit), the standard basis disappears. Is it possible to stop it from disappearing/keep it visible? I like having a guide for where my axes are when I'm rotating my object (which is sometimes symmetrical, making it easier to lose the origin/reference) and the guide helps me visualize what transformations I'm making.
#305688
I think this is not a developer question, but rather a Library Part/GDL-related question.
And I believe the answer to your question is no, you may not do that.

However, there may be a workaround you can use to achieve this, if I understood your question right. Just script a tiny 3D geometry at the GDL Origin, for example, using the BLOCK command. Then ARCHICAD will display the Origin because there is 3D geometry there to be displayed.
Of course, when you are done scripting your GDL Object, just delete or comment out that line in the script that generates this geometry.
#305709
There should be 2 standard basis (basii?).

One tagged "L" for "Local" and the other "G" for Global".
They should always be visible in the GDL editor 3D view window so long as you haven't turned the origin button off at the bottom of the 3D view window.
If they do disappear, try switching to 'OpenGL engine' or Internal (vectorial) engine' in the 3D windows settings - you should be able to right mouse click in the 3D view window for the 3D window settings option.
I think one works better than the other).

Or you may have to hit the 'show all' or 'last view' button at the bottom of the 3D view window.

I have never done it myself, but it is possible to script your own origin arrows using a cylinder and cone of a different colour for each axis (similar to what Laszlo was suggesting with the block).
This can be a separate object that you can "CALL" in at any time in your 3D script so you can see exactly where you local origin is.


Barry.