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Modelling and drafting in ARCHICAD. (Example: How can I model a Roof soffit/fascia?)

Moderators: Karl Ottenstein, LaszloNagy, ejrolon, Barry Kelly, gkmethy

By Felix Suen
#275121
Hi Everyone,

I am using ArchiCAD 21 and I ran into a bug when using a complex profile to model a curtain wall mullion.

In my hotlink module file the mullions look the way they were meant to and they join with each other fine. But when I import it to the master file, a weird bug happens where they join with weird projections. I have attached screen shots to what I am refering to.

I have checked everything from isolating the single row of mullions, changing layer priority, junction order and material property strengths in both files but it doesn't seem to have any affect on how the complex profile mullions join once it is inside the master file.

Has anyone encountered a similar issue? Any suggestions?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated! Thank you!
Attachments
profile-bug-1.jpg
By Lingwisyer
#275130
I've occasionally had a similar looking issue with curved walls in general around nodes when it attempts to autocomplete but instead results in a sliver extending beyond the intersection. I got around it by adding extra nodes on either side of the node in question.


Ling.

ps. You should probably add your Archicad version to your signature.
User avatar
By dkovacs
#276715
Hello Everyone,

We have examined the problematic file, and found the source of the problem.
Turns out the frames and panels were actually modelled from Profiled Walls/Beams/Columns. The weird 3D extensions were caused by Profiled Walls joining at a 179.3° angle. The connection couldn't be properly calculated for that shape, and it resulted in this.

Using slightly curved Walls (so they would meet at 180.0°), or a slightly bigger angle should solve this issue. Alternatively, You can just make the walls run into the column, and not intersect with each other (as it would work with Regular Curtain Walls most of the times).

Regards,